Week 4, Blog 2

What do you think about Yothu Yindi’s call for “Treaty”? Is this a way forward for us all in this country?

 

I personally believe that Yothu Yindi’s 1991 song Treaty is a strong political statement in a time where the case Mabo VS Queensland was in play. The time of release was important for both Indigenous and white Australians as the Australian government was being challenged by the issues of Land Rights and Aboriginal identity. I believe that the song isn’t a call for a treaty between both cultures but also propaganda for politics. This is because the music video includes Bob Hawke, the current Prime Minister in 1991. This  would have attracted many of those who had supported him. The song mainly reflection the visit of Bob Hawke in 1988, when he went to the Northern Territory for the Barunga festival (Yindi’s homeland). This similar other Australian bands such as Midnight Oil and Goanna protesting for the rights of the Indigenous Australians.

 

By having English and Yindi’s native language, it expresses the idea of a multicultural Australia. As well as it symbolic of the two cultures not being seen as one Australian “identity” but showing that there is a still a gap between both cultures. I believe through music; it is a way for political issues to become apparent to younger generations that wouldn’t know about the issue and allows younger generations to gain an understanding of the issue and develop their own ideas. Through younger generations interpreting issues differently to previous mediums, I believe it will change traditional views and can allow the gap between cultures to become smaller and eventually close.

Image from http://thehoopla.com.au/tag/yothu-yindi/

 

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4 thoughts on “Week 4, Blog 2

  1. Hey Riley,
    I really enjoyed reading your blog entry, I found it very insightful. I liked how you delved into some political context surrounding the text. I found your opinion on how English and Indigenous language being used alternatingly symbolises multiculturalism an interesting point. Your reference to other Australian bands such as Midnight Oil, serves as a good reminder that Youth Yindi were not acting alone in using their music as a tool for political activism.

    There are a few sentences I would consider rephrasing in order to make your meaning clearer. Such as “Through younger generations interpreting issues differently to previously mediums”, I gain the general meaning of your words. However, I feel as though you’re missing some information and have written “previously” which I assume should read “previous”. I found the same problem when reading “As well as it symbolic of the two cultures not being seen as one Australian “identity””. You are missing words, thus making your writing feel slightly disjointed. I would have also liked to have known what you specifically meant by “the gap between cultures”, I feel as though you could have elaborated and built on this point. I think you might need to read your post more closely before publishing. Some finer editing would greatly improve your writing, allowing you to convey your message more clearly.
    In summation, I feel that you show some good understanding of the significance of the text. I wish you well with your future posts and hope you find this feedback helpful. I really do mean it in the nicest way possible.

    “Criticism, like rain, should be gentle enough to nourish a man’s growth without destroying his roots.”
    -Frank A. Clark

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  2. HI Riley, I love the content of this entry- well done! However your expression does need some real attention. Look at this HUGE sentence which loses its grammatical direction:

    I believe that the song isn’t a call for a treaty between both cultures but also propaganda for politics as the music video that goes with song has Bob Hawke, the current Prime Minister in 1991, which would have gain the interested and liking of those who had supported him. The song mainly reflection the visit of Bob Hawke in 1988, when he went to the Northern Territory for the Barunga festival (Yindi’s homeland).

    Remember shorter sentences are easier to comprehend and easier to manage from the writer’s point of view. So short is beautiful. Of course occasionally a longer sentence is warranted, but always try a short version first. Long sentences can so easily lose their grammatical integrity- unless you are very careful!

    HERE IS MY ATTEMPT TO REWRITE YOUR SENTENCE:

    I believe that the song isn’t a call for a treaty between both cultures but IS also propaganda for politics. THIS IS BECAUSE the music video that goes with THE song IINCLUDES Bob Hawke, the current Prime Minister in 1991. THIS would have ATTRACTED the interest of those who supported him. The song mainly reflectS the visit of Bob Hawke in 1988, when he went to the Northern Territory for the Barunga festival (Yindi’s homeland). [HOW’S THAT???]

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